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Get in Malaysia

Posted by in on 5-17-13

Most nationalities can enter Malaysia without a visa, and they would be issued a 14, 30 or 90 day entry permit stamp on their passport. This would indicate the length of stay granted. Details can be found at http://www.kln.gov.my/web/guest/requirement-for-foreigner.

The following is a list of foreign nationals who can enter Malaysia without a visa:-

(A) Countries/territories that do not require a visa for stay up to 90 days:- Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay and Yemen.

(B) Countries/territories that do not require a visa for stay up to 30 days:-Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Congo (Democratic Republic of), Costa Rica, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Iraq, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Macao SAR, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Namibia, Nauru, Nicaragua, North Korea, Palestine, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Russia, Samoa, Sao Tome & Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Somalia, St Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Togo, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, Uzbekistan, Vatican City, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

(C) Countries/territories that do not require a visa for stay up to 14 days or others (if indicated):- Ivory Coast, Libya, Macao SAR (Travel Permit/Portugal CI), Sierra Leone, Somalia

In addition, no visa is required for U.S.A. citizens visiting Malaysia for social, business or academic purposes (except for employment).

No visa is required for a stay of less than one month for nationals of all ASEAN countries except Myanmar. For a stay exceeding one month a visa will be required, except for nationals of Brunei and Singapore.

Visas are required and permission must be granted from Ministry Of Home Affairs for citizens of Israel. For nationals of Republic of Serbia and Republic of Montenegro, visas are required without permission granted from Ministry Of Home Affairs. Nationals of countries other than those stated above (with the exception of Israel) are allowed to enter Malaysia without a visa for a visit not exceeding one month.

For people with Dual Citizenship (two passports), Malaysian immigration is pretty strict about this. It is advised that you exit your last port and enter into Malaysia with the same passport.

Up to date details and particulars of visa related information can be found at Immigration Department of Malaysia website [1] and the Malaysian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website [2].

Note that Sarawak has separate immigration laws and you will get a new visa on arrival there. For those who require a visa to visit Malaysia, you’ll need a separate one for Sarawak, so be sure to state this when applying at the Malaysian embassy/consulate.

If you require a visa to enter Malaysia, you might be able to apply for one at a British embassy, high commission or consulate in the country where you legally reside if there is no Malaysian diplomatic post. For example, the British embassies in Belgrade,Bogota, La Paz, Pristina[3], Santo Domingo[4], Sofia[5] and Tripoli[6] accept Malaysian visa applications (this list is not exhaustive). British diplomatic posts charge £50 to process a Malaysian visa application and an extra £70 if the authorities in Malaysia require the visa application to be referred to them. The authorities in Malaysia can also decide to charge an additional fee if they correspond with you directly.

Overstaying :-Overstaying in Malaysia is possible with $10 or 30RM fine per day. It is fairly simple to avoid overstaying by doing a visa run to a neighboring country overland or via a cheap flight.

 By plane

National carrier Malaysia Airlines (MAS) has extensive worldwide network coverage and regularly ranks high in airline quality assessments, while no-frills low-cost carrier AirAsia and her sister company, AirAsia X, now cover an ever-expanding set of destinations including Australia, China, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Laos, Macau, New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Myanmar and Vietnam.

* AirAsia [7], ☎ +60 3 8775 4000 (hotline within Malaysia: 1-300-88-9933)

* Malaysia Airlines [8], ☎ +60 3 7846 3000 (hotline within Malaysia: 1-300-88-3000)

Most international flights land at Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) [9] (IATA: KUL | ICAO: WMKK), although AirAsia flights use the LCC terminal, a 20km road transfer away from the main KLIA terminal. KLIA’s predecessor, the Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah Airport (IATA: SZB | ICAO: WMSA) in Subang near Kuala Lumpur handles chartered and turboprop aircraft for regional operators Firefly [10] and Berjaya [11] , ☎ +60 3 7846 8228 (ticketing only);, ☎ +60 3 2145 2828. See the Kuala Lumpur Get in section for detailed airport information.

Other airports which have significant numbers of flights to regional destinations are Kota Kinabalu (Sabah), Kuching (Sarawak), Penang, Langkawi and Johor Bahru. Many major Malaysian cities have service to Singapore via AirAsia or Firefly. Berjaya Air also operates routes from Singapore to the popular dive spots of Tioman and Redang.

 By train

* To/from Thailand: Direct sleeper train services operated by the State Railway of Thailand [12] connect Bangkok (Thailand) and Butterworth near Penang (Malaysia), while Keretapi Tanah Melayu (Malaysian Railways) [13] runs trains between Hat Yai (Thailand) and Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Both trains cross the border at Padang Besar where Thai and Malaysia immigration formalities are all conveniently done in the station. There is also a less used eastern route from Hat Yai to Thai border town Sungai Kolok, but there are no through trains to the nearby Malaysian station at Wakaf Bahru (near Kota Bharu).

* To/from Singapore: Singapore is the southern terminus of the Malayan Railway (Keretapi Tanah Melayu [14]) network. Comfortable overnight sleeper and somewhat misnamed daytime “express” trains connect Singapore with Kuala Lumpur and Tumpat, near Kota Bharu. Bizarrely, tickets purchased at the Singapore station are twice as expensive as those purchased in Malaysia; you can save quite a bit by taking the train from Johor Bahru instead. Another option is to buy your tickets online at the cheaper rate, but you must book at least 48 hours in advance.

 By bus

Long-distances buses/coaches into Malaysia run from Brunei, Indonesian Borneo, Singapore and Thailand. Please see the relevant city pages for more details.

* Brunei – there are no direct buses into Brunei. However, there are buses from Miri and Limbang going to the border where there are connections to Bandar Seri Begawan.

* Indonesia – direct buses operate between Pontianak in West Kalimantan and Kuching in Sarawak.

* Singapore – a multitude of bus companies operate direct routes from Singapore to various destinations in Peninsular Malaysia, including Malacca, Kuala Lumpur, Penang, East Coast cities and even the Kuala Lumpur suburbs of Petaling Jaya and Subang Jaya. Frequent buses make the short run between Singapore and Johor Bahru, and you can save a few bucks by changing at JB’s Larkin terminal to a cheap domestic bus instead of taking a more expensive direct bus. If you are planning to take on arrival visa, you must enter Malaysia via link 2.

* Thailand – several companies operate services from Kuala Lumpur and other cities in Malaysia to Hat Yai in southern Thailand, where direct connections are available to Bangkok and many other Thai destinations.

 By road

Land crossings are possible from southern Thailand and Singapore into Peninsular Malaysia, as well as from Brunei and Kalimantan (the Indonesian side of Borneo) into Sarawak. An International Drivers Permit (IDP) is required. See the respective city or state pages for more detailed information.

* Brunei – the main crossings are at Sungai Tujoh on the Miri, Sarawak, to Bandar Seri Begawan (Brunei) road, and the Kuala Lurah-Tedungan checkpoint which is used for traffic travelling between Bandar Seri Begawan and Limbang in Sarawak. You can also access the Temburong district of Brunei by road from Limbang via the Pandaruan (Puni on the Brunei side) checkpoint and Lawas via Trusan (Labu on the Brunei side).

* Indonesia – the main crossing is at the Tebedu-Entikong checkpoint on the main Kuching-Pontianak road. Various other minor border crossings used by locals are not necessarily open to foreigners.

* Singapore – the two crossings are the Causeway which links Johor Bahru with Woodlands in Singapore, and the Malaysia-Singapore Second Link which links Tanjung Kupang in Johor with Tuas in Singapore. See Johor Bahru Get in section and Singapore Get in section for more details.

* Thailand – international checkpoints (with the Thai towns in brackets) include Wang Kelian (Satun) and Padang Besar (Padang Besar) in Perlis, Bukit Kayu Hitam (Sadao) in Kedah, Pengkalan Hulu (Betong) in Perak, and Rantau Panjang (Sungai Kolok) in Kelantan.

 By boat

Ferries connect various points in Peninsular Malaysia with Sumatra in Indonesia and southern Thailand, Sarawak with Brunei, and Sabah with East Kalimantan in Indonesia and Mindanao in the Philippines. Luxury cruises also run from Singapore and sometimes Phuket (Thailand) to Malaysia.

* Brunei – ferries daily between the Muara Ferry Terminal in Brunei and Labuan island and Lawas in Sarawak. Speedboats, mostly in the morning, also run between Bandar Seri Begawan jetty and Limbang, Sarawak.

* Indonesia – the main jumping-off points from Indonesia are the Riau Islands of Batam, Bintan and Karimun; Dumai, Medan and Pekanbaru on the Sumatra mainland as well as Nunukan in East Kalimantan. Ferries link Batam with Batu Pahat and Johor Bahru;Bintan with Johor Bahru; Karimun with Batu Pahat and Kukup in Johor; Dumai with Malacca, Muar in Johor, Port Dickson (in Negeri Sembilan) and Port Klang, the port for Kuala Lumpur; Pekanbaru with Malacca. Daily ferries also link Nunukan with Tawau in Sabah. There are also minor crossings like between Bengkalis in Riau and Batu Pahat; Sumatra and Malacca and Muar in Johor; and Tanjung Balai Asahan in North Sumatra with Port Klang, the port for Kuala Lumpur.

* Philippines – ferries run between the Zamboanga Peninsula and Sandakan, Sabah.

* Singapore – daily passenger boats run between Changi Point and Pengerang, between Tanah Merah and Sebana Cover Resort, as well as between Changi and Tanjung Belungkor, all in Johor. See the Singapore Get in section for details.

* Thailand – four ferries daily (reduced to three during Ramadan) between Tammalang at Satun and Kuah on Langkawi, Malaysia. Vehicle ferries operate between Ban Taba near Tak Bai in Narathiwat province and Pengkalan Kubur in Kelantan, Malaysia, while passenger boats run between Ban Buketa in Narathiwat province and Bukit Bunga in Kelantan.

 On foot

You can walk in/out of Thailand at Wang Kelian and Padang Besar (both in Perlis), Bukit Kayu Hitam (Kedah), Pengkalan Hulu (Perak) and Rantau Panjang (Kelantan). However, crossing the Causeway on foot from Singapore is now illegal. \

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